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Author Topic: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?  (Read 52688 times)

Holly H

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Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« on: July 23, 2009, 01:46:28 PM »

Iíve had many home inspections done for my buyers over the years and lately Iím seeing inspectors reporting the homeís gas furnace or water heater piping was not equipped with a sediment trap?  Iíve never heard of such nonsense and neither has any other of the 25 agents in my office.  Can you tell me is this a new building code or are these guys making it up as they go along?
Thank you,

Holly
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CREIA Inspector

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2009, 02:05:02 PM »

Holly,

A sediment trap (sometimes referred to incorrectly as (Drip Traps or Drip Legs), is a small "Tee" pipe assembly installed in the gas line just before the appliance.  The idea is that any debris/sediment in the gas will fall into the trap before it reaches the appliance gas control.  The gas control valve is a sensitive device.  Any debris that contaminates the control can cause the system to operate unsafely. 

The requirement for Sediment Traps has been around for years.  Older Mechanical and Plumbing codes had requirements for sediment traps when local natural gas had debris in it.  In the last CA Code cycle, sediment traps became mandatory under all circumstances.  Most gas furnace and gas water heater manufacturers have required them for years as well.  You will find this in the appliance installation instructions under Gas Supply Requirements.  Also, the instructions are required to be left with the appliance.  The manufacturersí warranties will more than likely be void or invalid if these traps are not installed.  A sediment trap is a few dollars of pipe parts and 15 minutes of labor. 
Because the lack of a sediment trap poses an potential safety hazard and may void the warranty - it is a must call by any qualified home inspector.

« Last Edit: July 23, 2009, 02:06:47 PM by CREIA Inspector »
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Mike Hargrave

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2009, 03:46:49 PM »

Thanks for this explanation. Was not aware of the requirement. I am selling my home and the inspector indicated the trap was not installed.  The picture is also very helpful.
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Joe Enderle

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2010, 07:10:37 PM »

I have just had a home inspection and one finding was no sediment trap to furnace, The way it was plumed was to the furnace , then it drops about 4" to a "T" then to the water heater which DOES have a sediment trap. Is this OK ?
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CREIA Inspector

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2010, 11:33:47 AM »

Hi Joe
 
Without a photo of your situation I can only estimate at what you describe. Under the California Plumbing Code each gas fired furnace and water heater shall have its own individual gas supply piping shut-off valve.  Therefore, each shut-off valve shall be equipped with a sediment trap.  CPC 2007 - 1212.4 and 1212.7.
 
I hope this answers your question?
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Ron

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2010, 12:26:08 AM »

Hi, I'm installing a gas line to a tankless water heater and while I know it needs a sediment trap, I'm not sure about the way I'd like to install it.  The supply is coming from below the heater, so I would like to supply the tee from the side of the tee and supply the heater from the top of the tee and of course the leg would go down.  Is that legitimate?  Here's a rough idea of what I mean.  Thanks, Ron

             
                                        water heater
                                                 !
                                                 !
                                                 !
                                                 !
                                              !     !
                                              !     !
                                       -----!     !
        gas supply   -----------           !
                            !          -----!     !
                            !                 !     !
                            !                 !     !
                            !                 !     !
                            !                 !     !
                                              ------  leg w/cap
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Ron

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2010, 12:40:03 AM »

one more try at with a better picture...
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CREIA Inspector

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #7 on: April 27, 2010, 07:44:51 AM »

Ron
Thereís diagrams on this thread showing the proper configuration for a sediment trap. Basically, the gas supply should enter from the top of the Tee with the trap at the bottom of the Tee and the supply to the appliance from the side of the Tee.
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Will

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2010, 06:32:19 AM »

I understand a trap is required before the appliance.  Where else is it required in the gas line?  I heard when the gas line goes up...
Also, what size line is needed, 3/4" or 1/2"?
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CREIA Inspector

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2010, 02:32:53 PM »

Will, hopefully this section quoted from the California Plumbing Code will answer your questions.

2007 California Plumbing Code - 1212.7 Sediment Trap:  Where a sediment trap is not incorporated as a part of the gas utilization equipment, a sediment trap shall be installed as close to the inlet of the equipment as practical at the time of equipment installation. The sediment trap shall be either a tee fitting with a capped nipple in the bottom outlet, as illustrated in Figure 12-1, or other device recognized as an effective sediment trap. Illuminating appliances, ranges, clothes dryers, decorative vented appliances for installation in vented fireplaces, gas fireplaces, and outdoor grills shall not be required to be so equipped. [NFPA 54: 9.6.7]

The size pipe employed for the sediment trap should be the same as the pipe serving the appliance.  The code clearly states where sediment traps are required including the type of gas appliance that should have them. (see code ref)
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David

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2012, 11:43:23 AM »

Is a sediment trap required on ALL gas appliances? Stoves, dryers, etc... or just the furnace and water heater?
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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #11 on: March 28, 2012, 08:19:13 AM »

David
 
Sediment traps are only required on gas furnaces and water heaters where an integral trap is not installed by the manufacturer, California Plumbing Code Section 1212.7. http://www.iapmo.org/2010%20California%20Plumbing%20Code/Chapter%2012.pdf
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Martin Roa

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2012, 09:01:40 AM »

I just put in a new water heater, and decided to research to see if I did it right. My configuration has the trap between the supply and the shut-off valve, rather than between the shut-off valve and the water heater. Is that okay, or should I correct it?
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Martin Roa

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2012, 11:29:37 AM »

Never mind, I found in the code that the trap needs to be downstream, so it can be checked.
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Martin Roa

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Re: Gas Pipe Sediment Trap?
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2012, 08:41:41 AM »

I just put in a new water heater, and decided to research to see if I did it right. My configuration has the trap between the supply and the shut-off valve, rather than between the shut-off valve and the water heater. Is that okay, or should I correct it?

Grr, this is becoming very frustrating. I had purchased what the plumbing guy at Home Depot recommended (he had never heard of a gas line sediment trap). Here's what it looks like:





Well, after I realized the trap needs to be downstream, I went back to get a different valve, so I could connect the valve between two pieces of black pipe. The same guy helped me, and told me I could connect the compression end to the black pipe.


I tried it out, and this ended up leaking, with the black pipe rubbing against the valve handle. Not good. So I was planning to go back AGAIN and this time insist on a different valve, like this one:





But we had an HVAC professional at the house (he was adding freon to our 2-year-old leaky AC, which cost $430 to repair, even under warranty. Between the water heater and the AC, I can't catch a break this week...) He told me to go ahead and put the trap upstream from the valve, that the code doesn't matter, everyone does it that way.


Should I follow the advice of this professional, or should I follow my instinct and exchange the first valve for something like the second and follow the code?  Thanks for your patience and time.
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